Asian Indians

DID YOU KNOW?

Indian Americans make 80 percent of South Asians and form a “model minority.”

Indian Americans (or Asian Indians) are called the “Model Minority” of United States for good reasons. They are the third-largest Asian group in the United States making up 1 percent of the US population, and they comprise 80 percent of all South Asians in the United States. At the current rate, the population of Indian Americans is expected to double in the next 15 years.

ONE OUT OF NINE INDIAN AMERICANS ARE  MILLIONAIRES

As per Merrill Lynch Wealth Management, there are up to 223,000 firms owned by Indians Americans, and 20,000 hotels in the United States belong to Indian Americans.

MOST ARE FOREIGN BORN RECENT ARRIVALS

Over 80% of Indian-American adults are foreign-born, the highest percentage among the six largest Asian-American groups. Only half are U.S. citizens, the lowest share among the six Asian American subgroups.

HIGHEST EDUCATED  ETHNIC GROUP

Indian Americans are by far the highest educated among Asian-American groups, and 2.5 times the rate among overall U.S. population. Most of them work in highly skilled “specialty occupations” in the U.S, and 72% hold a bachelor’s degree or more.

Rich and Most Educated Ethnicity in US

Indian Americans are by far the richest and most educated ethnic group in the United States, employed in high-status, high-skill professions. Their median household income of $100,000—is nearly twice as high as that of white households in the US. They attain graduate and professional degrees at nearly four times higher rates as well. Forty percent of Indians age 25 or over have degrees higher than a bachelor’s, compared with 11 percent for the U.S. population. (Diversity in America Magazine, 2018)

Gaining Visibility in Arts and Media 

Indian Americans have served as CEOs of some of the most iconic US corporations, including Microsoft, Google, Adobe, PepsiCo, Mastercard, McKinsey and Citibank. They are also increasingly becoming visible in spaces that have long been inhospitable to them, such as politics, arts and media. Add to this their low rates of poverty, incarceration, divorce and reliance on public welfare, and one can see why Indian Americans are sometimes called a “model minority” in the United States.

The “Hindoo” Monk

In 1893, Swami Vivekananda, whom the American press referred to as the “Hindoo monk of India,” visited Chicago to represent Hinduism at the first-ever Parliament of the World’s Religions.

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